Dr. Solomon Carter Fuller Mental Health Center

Lillies by Marcia SewallThe Dr. Solomon Carter Fuller Mental Health Center is a Massachusetts Department of Mental Health 60-bed psychiatric in-patient facility. They provide quality, integrated care and support towards recovery for individuals needing forensic evaluation and those with mental illness who require continuing care.


The staff at the Fuller works to create an environment for their clients that fosters hope, supports self-determination, is inclusive of diverse ideas and opinions, adaptive to change, and a place where residents and staff are respectful of each other. “Being diagnosed with a mental illness can be an isolating, spirit-crushing experience,” says Melissa, a former client.


 


 


 


Rose by Matthew TovianShe acknowledges that “many individuals volunteered to transform a place of sterility into a place of reflection and inspiration – a sanctuary within an institution… this is only one example of what can happen when people come together to share their experience, strength and hope. It’s a beautiful beginning.”


“I would like to express my deep appreciation for the wonderful donations,” Vincent Moy, the Director of Rehabilitation Services, told The Art Connection…”the beautiful artwork will promote healing to all the patients we serve.”


 


Backyard Chair by Abby R. Zonies


 


The Fuller provides forensic evaluation and continuing care for individuals who are involved in legal issues who have mental illness, some of whom are required by law to be locked into the unit for anywhere from 20 days to several years. They have just completed a rooftop Healing Garden, created with a lot of input from former and current patients. Vincent says, “The Healing Garden is vital in promoting recovery and supporting the mission of DMH. It is not just about creating a place for fresh air.”


 


 


Earth, Green, Air, and Sky by Katherine MaloneyThe artwork donated through The Art Connection will also serve to create a more welcoming client-centered environment, or “a sanctuary within an institution”, for people staying at the Fuller regardless of the duration of their visit. Moy tells us that “the art in comfort rooms, where clients experiencing distress will go to be helped to calm down, will enhance recovery by creating a soothing and calming environment.” Art will also be on view for patients in the foyer outside the Healing Garden and in other public spaces throughout the facility.